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SUMMIT SERIES TOUR / TOURNEE DE LA SERIE DU SIECLE '72

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Bienvenue a TeamCanada1972.ca / Welcome to TeamCanada1972.ca

TEAM CANADA 1972 LAUNCHES NEW ONLINE SHOP

 

 

TEAM CANADA 1972 HAS LAUNCHED THEIR NEW ONLINE STORE:  ShopTeamCanada1972.ca

IT IS THE ONLY SITE FOR AUTHENTIC, OFFICIALLY LICENSED TEAM CANADA 1972 APPAREL AND COLLECTABLES.

PLEASE VISIT OUR NEW SHOP HERE.

TEAM NAMES THEIR VANCOUVER MODERATOR

Team Canada 1972 has announced that Squire Barnes

(Global TV's news and sports anchor in Vancouver)

will moderate the team's September 8 show.

Read the full press release below:

 

Global News Squire Barnes to moderate ’72 Summit Series Tour

Thursday, September 8 – Queen Elizabeth Theatre – 8 pm

RELIVE THE ’72 SUMMIT SERIES!

MONTREAL, June 27, 2016 – Forty-four years to the day after hitting the ice to face the Soviet Union, Bobby Clarke, Yvan Cournoyer, Ken Dryden, Phil Esposito, Rod Gilbert, Pete Mahovlich, Brad Park and Serge Savard? - eight of the greats - will be back on tour to relive the historic Summit Series of 1972.

This September, they’ll be visiting Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg and Vancouver – the same cities that hosted them in 1972 – as part of the ’72 Summit Series Tour. The tour brings them to Vancouver’s Queen Elizabeth Theatre on Thursday, September 8 at 8 pm.

Audiences will hear memories from both the locker room and away from the rink from the men who inspired generations of hockey players.

This unforgettable event will be heightened by state-of-the-art visual technology and sound design. A once in a lifetime opportunity to hear players tell their previously untold stories, how personal rivalries were resolved and a team formed in the crucible of competition. ?One stage. One night. A once-in-a-lifetime opportunity.

Global News Sports Anchor, Squire Barnes, will moderate the Vancouver event, leading the discussion amongst the players and directing the questions from the audience during the Q&A portion of the evening.

“If you’re a baby boomer, watching the ’72 Summit Series Tour lets you relive the emotion and the excitement of those games with the hockey stars themselves,” said the tour’s producer, Pierre Marchand. “But it’s just as much a way for young people to get a special look at a key moment in our history.”

“We want to show people from all over Canada the power of team spirit and just how far it can take you,” explained Serge Savard. “We’re incredibly excited to be able to finally tell people the details of our experience and answer the audience’s questions.”

“The story of Team Canada 1972 is the story of the power of teamwork. The real message of our Summit Series victory is not what we did, but how we did it,” added Team Canada representative Pat Stapleton. “The Summit Series was an event that forever shaped our team’s players and coaches as much as it did Canada and the game of hockey. For fans of the team and the series, this is an opportunity to hear hockey history from the people who made it. You never know which stories will come up; there are a million of them, some of which even the other players have not heard.”

Set against a spectacular background and aided by images that still send shivers down the spine four decades later, the players will finally tell the true story behind the Summit Series. They’ll discuss their thoughts on the Soviets, the doubts they had after losing their first match, the historic clashes, the discovery of a Russia that had been hidden behind the Iron Curtain and, finally, the powerful emotions that won them the Series – a victory they never stopped believing in.

September 2 – Place des Arts – Montreal

September 6 – Centennial Concert Hall – Winnipeg

September 8 – Queen Elizabeth Theatre – Vancouver

September 10 – Sony Centre for the Performing Arts – Toronto

Tickets to the Vancouver event are on sale now at www.ticketmaster.ca

or by calling 1-855-985-5000.

ABOUT SQUIRE BARNES

Squire Barnes’ entire working life has been spent in sports media. His career was launched at CKO Radio in Vancouver. From there, he moved on to CKWX Radio as the producer of the Tony Gallagher sports phone-in program. After that, he had a similar position at CHRX in Vancouver. Along the way, he has written numerous columns and articles for print publications.

Television beckoned in the 90s and Squire took over weekend sports at CBC Vancouver. When the BCTV Saturday Morning News was launched, Squire was a welcome addition to the news team.

As part of Global News Hour at 6, he continues to be one of the station’s most popular personalities, which can be attributed to his knowledge of sports and his slightly twisted sense of humour. Squire can also be seen regularly on Global News at 11 with Jay Durant and Sophie Lui and on Global News at Noon with Robin Stickley.

www.72summitseriestour.ca

Twitter: @teamcanada1972

#SummitSeries72

HAPPY BIRTHDAY, CASH!

Born June 24, 1945

TEAM CANADA 1972 AT THE O.M.H.A.

AS REPORTED EARLIER, KEN DRYDEN AND SERGE SAVARD SPOKE AT THE ONTARIO MINOR HOCKEY ASSOCIATION'S AGM RECENTLY (above), WHERE THEY ENTERTAINED AN AUDIENCE OF ABOUT 300 AND AWARDED CUSTOM-MADE JERSEYS TO LUCKY DRAW WINNERS (below).

PETE MAHOVLICH NEW PANTHERS ADVISOR

Team Canada 1972's Pete Mahovlich has been named a Special Advisor to the NHL's Florida Panthers, where he's been a pro scout for six seasons.

(His 1972 team-mate Dale Tallon is also Florida's President, Hockey Operations.)

Read the official news release HERE.

Congratulations, Pete!

TEAM CANADA 1972 REMEMBERS GORDIE HOWE

 

Mid-way through their live interview on SiriusXM's "Stellick & Simmer" show, Serge Savard (with Rob Simpson) and Brad Park (with Gord Stellick) get the news that Gordie Howe has just passed away.

Hear their immediate memories about "Mr. Hockey" HERE.

 

(Photo credit: Denis Brodeur/Getty Images)

"We weren't happy when we heard he died, but we were happy when we heard he retired."

- Serge Savard (on Gordie Howe)

BRAD AND KEN IN TORONTO: CTV/TSN

KEN DRYDEN AND BRAD PARK DISCUSSING THE UPCOMING TOUR FOR CTV TELEVISION STATIONS IN OTTAWA AND SASKATOON (1), A TORONTO TELEVISION AND RADIO SHOW (2), A LIVE TSN.CA ONLINE SEGMENT (3) AND WITH TSN RADIO IN OTTAWA (4).

 

1) Watch the "Ottawa CTV News At Noon" interview HERE. (Starts at 15:32)

 

2) Listen to the "Leafs Lunch with Andi Patrillo" interview HERE.

 

3) Watch the "Bar Down" interview HERE.

 

4) Listen to the "TSN Radio Ottawa" interview HERE and the "TSN Radio Vancouver" interview HERE.

BRAD AND KEN IN TORONTO: GLOBAL

ABOVE: BRAD PARK AND KEN DRYDEN APPEAR ON GLOBAL NEWS' MORNING SHOW. (Watch it HERE.)

BELOW: JOHN TORY, MAYOR OF TORONTO (FAR RIGHT), STOPS TO SAY HI TO THE BOYS AFTER THEIR INTERVIEW.

SERGE AND BRAD AND SUMMIT SERIES MEMORIES

IF YOU MISSED SERGE AND BRAD ON MONTREAL'S CHOM 97.7 FM THIS MORNING, YOU CAN HEAR THEIR INTERVIEW HERE.

ED JOHNSTON DISCUSSES GOALIES

With his victory in Game Two of the 2016 NHL Playoff Finals, the Pittsburgh Penguins’ Matt Murray surpassed Team Canada 1972’s Ken Dryden for the most wins in a playoffs by a rookie goaltender.

Ken’s mark was set during the 1971 playoffs, when he went 12-8, winning the Stanley Cup and Conn Smythe Trophy. Before those playoffs, he had played six NHL games, going 6-0-0. (Murray played 13 games before this year’s playoffs, with a 9-2-0-1 record.)

In a recent National Post article, Ed Johnston — Team Canada 1972 goalie and former Pittsburgh Penguins coach, assistant GM and Senior Adviser for Hockey Operations — said “Ken Dryden came right out of college to Montreal and stood everybody on their head. I can compare him to Murray because Murray’s been terrific.

“You can score a goal on Matt and it doesn’t bother him. Good, bad, whatever, no matter what kind of goal they score on him, he just focuses on the next play. Like Kenny, doesn’t get rattled."

Responding on the Penguins Facebook page, Murray says he's "uncomfortable" being measured against the Hall of Famer. “Pff. No. There's no comparison.”

KEN AND SERGE TO SPEAK AT OMHA AGM

The Ontario Minor Hockey Association has announced that Team Canada 1972 members Ken Dryden and Serge Savard will be guest speakers at the group's 2016 annual general meeting.

The pair will attend a dinner on June 10th in Richmond Hill (north of Toronto), to "relive and share stories and memories" of the Summit Series.

You can find the full OHMA announcement HERE.

HAPPY BIRTHDAY, STAN

Born May 20, 1940

 

Stan was a popular favourite member of Team Canada 1972 amongst his fellow players. Brad Park recalls one funny Summit Series moment in particular:

“I remember practicing in Sweden one day and Stan was leading the rush with puck, and when he got to the blueline he threw up in front of everyone. I believe it was from the night before, not the flu!”

As Harry Sinden wrote in 1972, "...we are all very proud that Stan Mikita is our teammate."

 

SPIRIT OF 1972 ALIVE IN 2016 NHL PLAYOFFS

Yvan Cournoyer parle des séries éliminatoires sur TVA Sports Montréal (regardez le clip ici).

 

The second round of the 2016 NHL Playoffs has strong ties to Team Canada 1972 — along with the entire Tampa Bay Lightning organization (which was founded by Phil and Tony Esposito), there are 19 players who share hometowns with members of Canada’s “Team of the Century”:

 

HAMILTON, Ontario

1972 — Ken Dryden

2016 — Ryan Ellis (Predators)

 

KENORA, Ontario

1972 — Gary Bergman

2016 — Mike Richards (Capitals)

 

KITCHENER, Ontario

1972 — Don Awrey, Bill Goldsworthy

2016 — Michael Latta (Capitals)

 

MONTREAL, Quebec

1972 — Rod Gilbert, Ed Johnston, Guy Lapointe

2016 — Kris Letang (Penguins), Mike Ribeiro (Predators), Marc-Edouard Vlasic (Sharks)

 

OAKVILLE, Ontario

1972 — Vic Hadfield

2016 — Scott Wilson (Penguins)

 

REGINA, Saskatchewan

1972 — Red Berenson 

2016 — Chris Kunitz (Penguins)

 

TORONTO, Ontario

1972 — Brian Glennie, Brad Park, Harry Sinden, Bill White

2016 — Mike Blunden (Lightning), Casey Cizikas (Islanders), Trevor Daley (Penguins), Jamie Orleksiak (Stars), Adam Pelech (Islanders), Jason Spezza (Stars), Joel Ward (Sharks), Tom Wilson (Capitals), Daniel Winnik (Capitals)

 

VANCOUVER, British Columbia

1972 — John Ferguson 

2016 — Troy Brouwer (Blues), Ryan Johansen (Predators)

HAPPY BIRTHDAY, TONY

Born April 23, 1943

THE TEAM OF THE CENTURY IS ON TOUR IN 2016!

 COME SEE US IN SEPTEMBER!

 

LISTEN TO SERGE SAVARD AND HARRY SINDEN DISCUSS THE UPCOMING TOUR HERE

IN VANCOUVER : IN PRINT

READ PHIL ESPOSITO'S Q&A WITH "THE PROVINCE" HERE.

IN VANCOUVER : ON TV

WHILE IN VANCOUVER, TEAM CANADA 1972 MEMBERS WERE GUESTS OF THE CANUCKS AT ONE OF THEIR HOME GAMES (DURING WHICH PHIL WAS INTERVIEWED).

CHECK OUT HIS IN-GAME INTERVIEW HERE.

AS WELL, PAT, DENNIS AND PHIL APPEARED ON GLOBAL'S MORNING NEWS -- WATCH IT HERE.

IN VANCOUVER : WITH THE CANUCKS

(above) DENNIS, PAT AND PHIL JOIN THE VANCOUVER CANUCKS IN THE TEAM'S DRESSING ROOM, FOR A "28-8"-INSPIRED TALK ABOUT THE POWER OF TEAMWORK.

(below) CANUCKS HEAD COACH WILLIE DESJARDINS JOKES WITH THE BOYS, DURING THEIR VISIT TO THE ROGERS ARENA.

IN VANCOUVER : ON RADIO

PHIL ESPOSITO, DENNIS HULL AND PAT STAPLETON (above) PREPARE FOR THEIR INTERVIEW ON ROCK 101'S "WILLY IN THE MORNING" (below).

YOU CAN HEAR THEIR INTERVIEW HERE.

DANS LA VILLE DE MONTREAL, AVEC ROD ET PETE

TÉLÉVISION (AVEC ELIAS MAKOS)...

...ET RADIO.

PETE MAHOVLICH : LORD OF THE RING

PETE SHOWS OFF HIS TEAM CANADA 1972 "TEAM OF THE CENTURY" RING.

KEN DRYDEN GETS SIRIUS

LISTEN TO KEN'S INTERVIEW ON "STELLICK & SIMMER IN THE MORNING" RIGHT HERE.

ROD AND PETE : ON THE AIR IN MONTREAL

TEAM CANADA 1972 MEMBERS ROD GILBERT (left) AND PETE MAHOVLICH (centre) -- ON TSN 690 AM, WITH MITCH MELNICK.

YOU CAN LISTEN TO THEIR EPIC INTERVIEW HERE.

BOB CLARKE ON HOCKEY CENTRAL AT NOON

BOB GETS INTO AN IN-DEPTH DISCUSSION OF SUMMIT SERIES NASTINESS WITH THE "HOCKEY CENTRAL AT NOON" PANEL (DAREN MILLARD, NICK KYPREOS AND DOUG MACLEAN).

YOU CAN LISTEN TO THE INTERVIEW HERE.

IN STUDIO, IN TORONTO : SIRIUS XM NHL NETWORK RADIO

PAT CHATS WITH "STELLICK & SIMMER" CO-HOSTS GORD STELLICK (centre) AND ROB SIMPSON (left). 

HARRY SINDEN JOINED IN OVER THE PHONE, FOR THE RECORDING OF A TWO-SEGMENT INTERVIEW FOR SIRIUS XM SATELLITE RADIO.

 

YOU CAN LISTEN TO PART ONE OF THE INTERVIEW HERE.

AND YOU CAN LISTEN TO PART TWO OF THE INTERVIEW HERE.

IN STUDIO, IN TORONTO : PRIME TIME SPORTS

   

(left) PAT STAPLETON JOINS HOST BOB MCCOWN AND CO-HOST MICHAEL GRANGE, FOR A LENGTHY DISCUSSION, ON "PRIME TIME SPORTS."

(right) GUESTS RECEIVE A BOTTLE OF THE HOUSE-BRAND WATER.

KEN AND PAT TAKE TORONTO - PART 4

THE "BREAKFAST TELEVISION" LIVE INTERVIEW WITH KEN AND PAT IS BROADCASTED HIGH ABOVE TORONTO'S DUNDAS SQUARE.

YOU CAN WATCH THE INTERVIEW HERE.

KEN AND PAT TAKE TORONTO - PART 3

"BREAKFAST TELEVISION" HOST DINA PUGLIESE SHARES SOME LAUGHS WITH THE BOYS BEFORE STARTING HER LIVE INTERVIEW WITH THEM.

KEN AND PAT TAKE TORONTO - PART 2

KEN AND PAT LEARN THE ROPES OF THE "60-SECOND CHALLENGE" BEFORE FILMING AN UPCOMING SEGMENT FOR "YOUR WORLD THIS WEEK."

KEN AND PAT TAKE TORONTO - PART 1

PAT STAPLETON AND KEN DRYDEN DISCUSS THE TEAM AND THE TOUR WITH "ENTERTAINMENT CITY" HOST TANYA KIM, AT THE SHOW'S DOWNTOWN STUDIOS.

TO RUSSIA, WITH LOVE...

Vladislav Tretiak -- 1972 Soviet goaltender and current president of the Ice Hockey Federation of Russia -- holds a custom-made, limited-edition Team Canada 1972 jersey, donated in support of the recent CERBA charity auction he hosted in Moscow (for children's, social and family institutions).

In honour of the 2016 event, Rod Seiling's number 16 was selected; the sweater is signed by Rod and fellow team members Phil Esposito, Serge Savard, Mickey Redmond, Red Berenson, Brian Glennie, Pete Mahovlich, Dennis Hull, Yvan Cournoyer, Jocelyn Guevremont, Don Awrey, Jean Ratelle, Rod Gilbert, Pat Stapleton, Brad Park, Ed Johnston, Bob Clarke and Harry Sinden.

HAPPY BIRTHDAY, BOBBY

Born March 20, 1948

TOUR PROMO IN WINNIPEG - PART III

Pete Mahovlich and Pat Stapleton are in Winnipeg, promoting the team's September tour.

While there, they were guests of the NHL's Winnipeg Jets (who were playing against Pat's former team, the Chicago Black Hawks).

PAT AND PETE ENJOYING THE GAME (BEFORE PETE STEALS PAT'S POPCORN)

 

PETE STILL ENJOYING THE GAME...ALONG WITH PAT'S POPCORN!!!

 

PETE AND PAT MEET TSN'S SARA ORLESKY, BEFORE THEIR 2ND-PERIOD INTERVIEW WITH HER

 

PAT AND PETE DISCUSS THE TEAM'S UPCOMING TOUR WITH SARA ORLESKY

TOUR PROMO IN WINNIPEG - PART II

Pat Stapleton and Pete Mahovlich are in Winnipeg, promoting the team's September tour.

Here are some photos (with more to come)!

PETE ARRIVES AT THE AIRPORT, BEFORE HEADING TO AN INTERVIEW AT THE WINNIPEG FREE PRESS CAFÉ

 

THE CROWD STARTS TO GATHER TO HEAR PETE AND PAT DISCUSS THE UPCOMING '72 SUMMIT SERIES TOUR

 

PETE AND PAT EXPLORE THE SUMMIT SERIES WITH HOST GEOFF KIRBYSON (centre) AT THE WINNIPEG FREE PRESS CAFÉ

JOYEUX ANNIVERSAIRE, GUY

Born March 18, 1948

TOUR PROMO IN WINNIPEG - PART I

Pat Stapleton and Pete Mahovlich are both in Winnipeg, promoting the team's September tour.

Here are some initial shots (with more to come)!

PAT, WITH HOST RICK RALPH, IS A GUEST ON THE "RONA ROUNDTABLE"

 

PAT, ON THE "HUSTLER AND LAWLESS" SHOW

 

PAT PREPARES FOR "WHEELER IN THE MORNING WITH PHILLY & RENA"

WATCH THE INTERVIEW HERE.

JOYEUX ANNIVERSAIRE, JOCELYN

Born March 1, 1951

HAPPY BIRTHDAY, PHIL!

Born February 20, 1942

DANS LES NOUVELLES...

 

L’annonce de Team Canada 1972 de leur prochaine tournée de spectacles a suscité une vague de couverture médiatique à travers le pays.

Serge Savard et Yvan Cournoyer ont participé à l’émission "Tout Le Monde En Parle” de Radio-Canada. Vous pouvez visionner l’entrevue ICI.

IN THE NEWS...

The team's February 9th announcement of their upcoming tour garnered a wave of media coverage across Canada.

Ken Dryden appeared on CTV's Canada AM -- watch his interview HERE

 

TEAM CANADA 1972 ANNOUNCES 2016 TOUR

RELIVE THE ’72 SUMMIT SERIES!

MONTREAL, QUEBEC – Forty-four years to the day after hitting the ice to face the Soviet Union, Serge Savard, Phil Esposito, Yvan Cournoyer, Bobby Clarke, Ken Dryden, Pat Stapleton, Peter Mahovlich and others will relive their memories and go behind the scenes of the historic Summit Series of 1972. This September, they’ll be visiting Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg and Vancouver – the same cities that hosted them in 1972 – as part of the ’72 Summit Series Tour.

“If you’re a baby boomer, watching the Summit Series reunion lets you relive the emotion and the excitement of those games with the hockey stars themselves,” said the tour’s producer, Pierre Marchand. “But it’s just as much a way for young people to get a special look at a key moment in our history.”

“We want to show people from all over Canada the power of team spirit and just how far it can take you,” explained Serge Savard. “We’re incredibly excited to be able to finally tell people the details of our experience and answer the audience’s questions.”

“The story of Team Canada 1972 is the story of the power of teamwork. The real message of our Summit Series victory is not what we did, but how we did it,” added Team Canada representative Pat Stapleton. “The Summit Series was an event that forever shaped our team’s players and coaches as much as it did Canada and the game of hockey. For fans of the team and the series, this is an opportunity to hear hockey history from the people who made it. You never know which stories will come up; there are a million of them.”

In the middle of the Cold War, as hockey was becoming a global sport, Team Canada faced the Soviets and found them to be much tougher opponents than expected. It was down to the wire when the NHL all-stars finally won the series, seconds before the end of the last match. It was an ending truly worthy of a Hollywood movie.

Set against a spectacular background and aided by images that still send shivers down the spine four decades later, the players will finally tell the true story behind the Summit Series. They’ll discuss their thoughts on the Soviets, the doubts they had after losing their first match, the historic clashes, the discovery of a Russia that had been hidden behind the Iron Curtain and, finally, the powerful emotions that won them the Series – a victory they never stopped believing in.

If baby boomers can still remember where they were during the Summit Series in 1972, there’s no question as to where they’ll want to be 44 years later:

September 2 – Place des Arts – Montreal

September 6 – Centennial Concert Hall – Winnipeg

September 8 – Queen Elizabeth Theatre – Vancouver

September 10 – Sony Centre for the Performing Arts – Toronto

Tickets are available as of February 13.
To purchase tickets in Toronto, Vancouver, or Winnipeg, please call 1-855-985-5000 or visit www.ticketmaster.ca. Ticket sales start at 10 am.

To purchase tickets in Montreal, please visit the Place des Arts box office or call 514-842-2112 as of 12 pm. Tickets are available online at www.laplacedesarts.com as of 10 am.

ABOUT PIERRE MARCHAND

In 1986, Pierre Marchand founded Quebec’s first French language music television station, MusiquePlus. Seeing the success of this channel with young people, he created MusiMax, a television station for adult contemporary music in 1997. He led the two television channels as president until 2007.

That same year, he became president of Groupe Archambault’s music sector, managing Quebec’s largest music retailer. In addition, he headed Distribution Select, Canada’s largest independent music distributor, and Musicor, Quebec’s number one francophone music label. In 2008, he expanded the business and added a television division, organizing performances by Paul McCartney, Sting, and Placido Domingo. A new show division followed in 2009. In the next three years, it will produce and broadcast more than 600 concerts and events.

Since 2014, Pierre Marchand’s passions for records, shows, television, and events have been united under his company Atmosphere Musique Inc.

CELEBRATE THE NEW YEAR WITH TEAM BIRTHDAYS IN JANUARY

RON ELLIS - January 8, 1945

FRANK MAHOVLICH - January 10, 1938

SERGE SAVARD - January  22, 1946

PAUL HENDERSON - January 28, 1943

 

Happy Birthday et Joyeux Anniversaire!!!

"HOMETOWN HOCKEY" RECAP

Rogers HometownHockey has posted a page of "memorable moments" from its recent broadcast from Sarnia, Ontario...including an event with Team Canada 1972's Pat Stapleton and fellow NHLers Darryl Sittler, Dino Ciccarelli and Mike Stapleton.

For more, click HERE.

PAT STAPLETON ON HOLIDAY EDITION OF "HOMETOWN HOCKEY"

Team Canada 1972 member Pat Stapleton joins host Ron MacLean Dec. 20th, at 6pm EST (on Rogers Sportsnet) for a special one-hour holiday edition of "Rogers Hometown Hockey Pre-Game."

For a preview of the programme, please click HERE.

MERRY CHRISTMAS AND A HAPPY NEW YEAR, FROM US TO YOU!!!

Team Canada 1972 wishes you the best this holiday season. We also invite you to enjoy The Curse of Clara.

Our favourite line in the movie is when Phil Esposito offers advice on controlling unruly hair: "...my brother Tony uses a combo of hair-spray and bacon fat, if that helps. He swears by it!"

CLICK ON PHIL BELOW, TO WATCH HIM IN THE CURSE OF CLARA: A HOLIDAY TALE

TEAM CANADA 1972 IN THE NEWS

The Toronto Sun has published an interview with Phil Esposito, regarding his participation in the December 14th release of "The Curse of Clara."

Phil discusses working on the movie, as well as his involvement with other team ventures.

You can read the article HERE.

PHIL ESPOSITO STARS IN 2015 HOLIDAY TELEVISION SPECIAL

Phil Esposito will appear December 14 in the animated original "The Curse of Clara: A Holiday Tale."

Phil lent his his voice and Team Canada 1972 character to the film, about a young ballet dancer taking on a role that's considered cursed; he plays her imaginary mentor, who helps her persevere.

The 30-minute special weaves elements of both "The Nutcracker" and the Summit Series into its storyline.

DRYDEN AND ESPOSITO GOALIE STAMPS UNVEILED

Team Canada 1972 members Ken Dryden and Tony Esposito have been included in Canada Post's "2015 NHL Great Canadian Goalies" stamp collection.

In all, six greats -- all Vezina winners -- had stamps issued, celebrating goaltenders who are considered to have transformed hockey. 

Congratulations, Tony and Ken!

 

(Images copyright Canada Post Corporation)

TEAM BIRTHDAYS IN DECEMBER

RED BERENSON - December 8, 1939

JEAN-PAUL PARISÉ - December 11, 1941

MICKEY REDMOND - December 27, 1947

 

Happy Birthday et Joyeux Anniversaire!!!

DID YOU KNOW?

Before the ground-breaking 1972 Summit Series, no Russian-born and -raised player had ever been in the NHL. Today, around 3.5% of the league are Russians.

There are estimates that as many as 18 million Canadians (out of a total population of 21 million) either watched or listened to Game Eight of the Summit Series.

It’s also estimated that as many as 110 million (out of a total population of 245 million) watched the game in the Soviet Union.

HARRY SINDEN - SUMMIT SERIES REFLECTIONS

 

"How did we beat them? I don't have the answers.

"How did the Russians lose when they can skate as well as us, pass as well as us, take a pass as well as us, play a better team game than us, and outcondition us? The only area in which I thought we were really superior was shooting. Just look at the way we won the last three games, games we couldn't afford to lose. We won all of them in the closing minutes. They were stronger physically, but we were tougher mentally."

After Game Eight "[when] we realized that this was the last time, perhaps forever, Team Canada would be together as a group...no one said anything, but you could sense a nostalgic feeling vibrating among the players. Then someone started humming a song; I'm pretty sure it was Phil Esposito. Then he started to sing it: 'Thanks for the Memories'...and almost like it had been rehearsed, every guy stood in front of his locker, stopped for a few minutes, and joined in as loudly as he could. It lacked quality, but it had heart.

"And right down to the end, the last thing they would do together as a team abounded with the greatest attribute of this squad: Heart.

"Thanks for the memories."

 

All quotes are from Harry Sinden’s “Hockey Showdown: The Canada-Russia Hockey Series”

(Doubleday Canada, 1972)

TEAM BIRTHDAYS IN NOVEMBER

GILBERT PERREAULT - November 13, 1950

ROD SEILING - November 14, 1944

DENNIS HULL - November 19, 1944

YVAN COURNOYER - November 22, 1943

ED JOHNSTON - November 24, 1935

 

Happy Birthday et Joyeux Anniversaire!!!

SUMMIT SERIES MOMENT - STAN MIKITA RETURNS

 

 

"[Prague was a] homecoming for Stan Mikita, a real pro.

"Stan left Czechoslovakia when he was eight and his mother sent him to live in Canada with an aunt and uncle. During the years his family was still behind the Iron Curtain. Stan kept in touch. When he made the big leagues he sent money to his mother regularly and never forgot his people. 

"We made Stan captain tonight and when he was introduced, he got the greatest ovation of any player on either squad. [After the game] we assembled early to catch our buses at the hotel in Prague and sat by sadly as Stan Mikita's mom sobbed uncontrollably when we were leaving. It was very moving and loving. I had the feeling that Stan's mom felt she was never going to see her son again. It was that kind of scene.

"I couldn't make the banquet the Czechs gave for us last night because I was sick. The guys told me that Stan gave a tremendous speech in his native tongue. Today we are all very proud that Stan Mikita is our teammate."

 

All quotes are from Harry Sinden’s “Hockey Showdown: The Canada-Russia Hockey Series”

(Doubleday Canada, 1972)

DID YOU KNOW?

The 35 players on Team Canada 1972 came from 10 different NHL clubs: 

Montreal Canadiens (6), Boston Bruins (5), Chicago Blackhawks (5), New York Rangers (5),  Detroit Red Wings (4), Toronto Maple Leafs (3), Buffalo Sabres (2), Minnesota North Stars (2), Vancouver Canucks (2) and Philadelphia Flyers (1).

TEAM BIRTHDAYS IN OCTOBER

JEAN RATELLE - October 3, 1940

VIC HADFIELD - October 4, 1940

GARY BERGMAN - October 7, 1938

PETE MAHOVLICH - October 10, 1946

DALE TALLON - October 19, 1950

 

Happy Birthday et Joyeux Anniversaire!!!

HARRY SINDEN - GAME EIGHT FLASHBACK

SEPTEMBER 28

"This has to be what heaven feels like. We beat the Russians today 6 to 5 in a fantastic hockey game. I've been wrong about a lot of things in this series, but I was right when I said it was going to be the greatest hockey game ever played. It was--if you're Canadian.

"They had us where they wanted us--leading 5 to 3 going into the third period--and then we took it away from them. They had one of their stooges refereeing--Kompalla--and we still beat them even when it was obvious that he was going out of his way to do everything to aid their cause. These Germans would do anything the Russians wanted them to do. The name of the game is still to put the puck in the net and in the end we did it three times to beat them in the final period. In the end, they were leaning over their sticks and we were doing the celebrating.

"More than jubilation, we all felt vindication. We had showed our detractors that when it was all on the line, we could do the job. And we did it our way.

"I'm not going to get any sleep, I can see that."

 

All quotes are from Harry Sinden’s “Hockey Showdown: The Canada-Russia Hockey Series”

(Doubleday Canada, 1972)

HARRY SINDEN - GAME SEVEN FLASHBACK

SEPTEMBER 26

"It's all even now. Our defensive play saved us. Offensively, we stunk. We couldn't attack as a team at all. Our goals were almost all great individual efforts, and Henderson's was as good as you're ever going to see. It was the most exciting goal I've ever seen. It freaked out the players, too, they went wild.

"Mikhailov had kicked Bergman so viciously in the fight that he ripped Gary's stockings, put holes in his shinpads where the point punctured them, and cut the side of his leg. Our players were going berserk on the bench when they saw the Russian kicking. Bergman couldn't get at him because the officials were in between, but Cournoyer, who seldom fights in the NHL, got so mad he moved in and ripped five or six good left hooks at Mikhailov. If Bergman had ever got free, he would have killed him.

"Because of the double penalty to Bergman and Mikhailov, both sides had to play with four skaters in the final minutes. And this opened the door for Henderson, who appears to have Tretiak's number.

"I told the press after the game, 'I think the last game will be the greatest ever in hockey.' I meant it. The talent is here. The emotion is here. The drama is here."

 

All quotes are from Harry Sinden’s “Hockey Showdown: The Canada-Russia Hockey Series”

(Doubleday Canada, 1972)

DID YOU KNOW?

Before the Summit Series, nine members of Team Canada 1972 had played against a Soviet team: Red Berenson, Ken Dryden, Brian Glennie, Bobby Orr, Gilbert Perreault, Mickey Redmond, Serge Savard, Rod Seiling and Harry Sinden.

HARRY SINDEN - GAME SIX FLASHBACK

SEPTEMBER 24

"The spell is wearing off. Whatever they've had going for them isn't there any more. We eliminated a big part of the Russian mystique tonight when we beat them 3 to 2, despite those two West German stiffs who call themselves referees. One thing about these guys, they're consistant--always bad. Tonight these guys strengthened my belief that they are the most incompetent officials I've ever seen.

"It was a great win for us...we're in good shape, believe me. The Russians are faltering. We're coming on and getting better each game, forcing them into mistakes. They're not as smooth passing the puck as they were in Canada. And Tretiak is starting to come apart a little.

"I've seen Phil Esposito play a lot of hockey games, but this is the first time I'd ever seen him block shots. The other guys we had out there--Stapleton, White, Mahovlich--were also throwing their bodies in front of the puck to frustrate the Russians. And we did.

"Another great thing about this victory is that we won't have to look at those Germans again. They're gone. For the last two games we have the Swede and the Czech. We're lucky. If the Germans had one of the last two games it would be just impossible to win the series."

 

All quotes are from Harry Sinden’s “Hockey Showdown: The Canada-Russia Hockey Series”

(Doubleday Canada, 1972)

HARRY SINDEN - GAME FIVE FLASHBACK

SEPTEMBER 22

"We're just not destined to win this thing. I've never felt so helpless in my life as I did tonight in the third period when the Russians scored five goals on us. Five goals against the "greatest" players in the world! We stopped skating. But why?

"I really expected to win this one. We were ready. There was no doubt in my mind. This thought was confirmed when we got to the dressing room and Phil Esposito started grumbling. When Phil's bitchy, he's ready. Why the hell do 17 of 18 guys all of a sudden stop skating? I could see it happening to one guy, or even a line. But a whole team?

"If nothing else was gained tonight, we found we had at least 3,000 Canadian comrades. They even cheered us in defeat, which was something. I'm as close to [the players] as anyone, and I like them personally, but I couldn't be man enough to cheer after a game like that. 

"There wasn't any right thing to say after this. I've said all I could for six weeks. They've listened to me enough. Now they've got to come up with their own answers."

 

All quotes are from Harry Sinden’s “Hockey Showdown: The Canada-Russia Hockey Series”

(Doubleday Canada, 1972)

HARRY SINDEN - SWEDISH FLASHBACKS

SEPTEMBER 16

"This is a great place for a holiday, but not for hockey. From what they showed me tonight the Swedes are good, but not in the same league with the Russians, although we had to put out to beat them. Like the Russians, the Swedes proved to be great ones for interfering.

"We won this game because the Swedes were a little in awe of us. I think [they] geared themselves for a rough game, playing against the NHL stars. But they don't know what a rough game is by our standards.

"We had two [West German referees]--Baader and Kompalla--and they were absolutely terrible. They couldn't even skate. Of course, the officials seemed intent on showing the Canadians they weren't going to be intimidated by any of the antics of these professionals. Their incompetence helped the game become very bitter...we lost Phil for ten minutes because they didn't know their own international rules. And these guys are supposed to be two of the best in Europe."

SEPTEMBER 17

"I've seen a lot of terrible things happen on the ice during a hockey game. But [nothing was] as vicious as the one tonight in our second and, thank God, last game with the Swedes.

"Ulf Sterner, a Swede who had played in Canada for a couple of years and was known as a chicken, nearly skewered Wayne Cashman's tongue. He did it deliberately. There are no two ways about it. I can't believe there wasn't a penalty.

"I met with Fergie...after we went over all that happened to us in the past 48 hours we came to several conclusions. One, refereeing will be our biggest problem in Moscow. Two, if we don't start playing better, we're going to lose. Three, what happened here could bring us closer together as a team, and in the final result, might be a blessing in disguise--although it's difficult for me to associate this nightmare with any type of blessing."

SEPTEMBER 18

"When I selected the name for this team--Team Canada--I did so because I wanted a name that would reflect a total commitment of our country to this team. Tonight I can sit here and say I truly believe we don't represent all Canadians any more. All day [we've] been brought up to date by phone calls from home relating how a large segment of the population has quit on us.

"When this trip was formed, it was agreed that we would take part of our team to a small town--Sodertalje...we worked out for one hour and 20 minutes. Then they brought out their pee-wee teams, youngsters 12 and 13, to play a mock game against us...we opened by having Dionne, our little centre, face off against their little centre and the crowd roared with laughter...Guy Lapointe did a great job playing a drunken sailor on skates, weaving up and down the ice. Many of our players clowned around with the kids, gave autographs, and worked individually with them giving tips.

"I was proud of our players. People might be jumping off our band-wagon in Canada, but I'll bet the people of Sodertalje are in our corner."

SEPTEMBER 19

"Our players must be superhuman. Today we had the best practice session we've had together and it proved that, contrary to public opinion, we are in much better physical condition than the Russians. Let's face it. Could the Russians stay out all night drinking and carousing like our guys do and still skate their butts off the next day? Never.

"You really don't have a team until the players go through something which forces them to band together even tighter. Putting on the same jerseys doesn't make a team. You're still just a collection of individuals until you find a common goal.

"Our own people deserting us, and the Europeans picking away at us, have given us a common cause."

 

NOTE: Ulf Sterner was the first European-trained player in the NHL and suited up for the 1964-65 New York Rangers (playing with Team Canada 1972 members Rod Gilbert, Vic Hadfield, Jean Ratelle and Rod Seiling).

All quotes are from Harry Sinden’s “Hockey Showdown: The Canada-Russia Hockey Series”

(Doubleday Canada, 1972)

DID YOU KNOW?

In the NHL season before the Summit Series, 11 of the 12 players named to the First and Second All-Star teams ended up as members of Team Canada 1972.

In the NHL season that followed the Summit Series, all 12 players named to the First and Second All-Star teams had been members of Team Canada 1972.

HARRY SINDEN - GAME FOUR FLASHBACK

SEPTEMBER 8

"Looking back at this game, I can see I made a mistake by changing the lineup. We should have stuck with the guys who won for us in Toronto.

"I am concerned about the officiating as much as I am about our stamina. The referees folded a little bit in the third game. Once again the officiating hurt us [by waving off a goal]. To me that was the turning point of the game. If that goal had been allowed it could have been a different game.

"But it wasn't our night anyway. It's a shame to close out the Canadian part of the series playing so poorly. Now the Russians are going home in great shape psychologically. 

"The only real weakness I can see right now in the Russians is that they aren't terribly good in their own end. They give away too many good shots."

 

All quotes are from Harry Sinden’s “Hockey Showdown: The Canada-Russia Hockey Series”

(Doubleday Canada, 1972)

HARRY SINDEN - GAME THREE FLASHBACK

SEPTEMBER 6

"We had another great hockey game tonight. We didn't win, but it was still a great game. Someone once said that a tie is as exciting as kissing your sister. Well for the last 10 minutes tonight that hockey game -- 4 to 4 -- looked like Racquel Welch to me.

"I have to give the Russians all the credit in the world. When we were ahead 4 to 2, and playing so well, I thought we were getting ready for a romp. But they didn't lose their poise, and when they got those two goals back so easily I was really shook up. [They] all look the same, skate the same, shoot the same, the whole game without ever changing expression.

"They just keep coming at you...I've never had to contend with anything like this in my life before."

 

All quotes are from Harry Sinden’s “Hockey Showdown: The Canada-Russia Hockey Series”

(Doubleday Canada, 1972)

TEAM BIRTHDAYS IN SEPTEMBER

JOHN FERGUSON - September 5, 1938

HARRY SINDEN - September 14, 1932

 

Happy Birthday, coaches!!!

HARRY SINDEN - GAME TWO FLASHBACK

SEPTEMBER 4

"We put it to them tonight 4 to 1. I worried all day about the Russians adjusting to the changes we were going to make. But they didn't adjust. They just went out and played their game and I guess that's the way it's going to be for all eight games.

"I was proud of myself and John Ferguson. I think we had as much to do with winning this game as coaches can have. All the changes we made worked. They were the difference.

"This was a helluva hockey game. It's like Stanley Cup...maybe even faster paced."

 

All quotes are from Harry Sinden’s “Hockey Showdown: The Canada-Russia Hockey Series”

(Doubleday Canada, 1972)

HARRY SINDEN - GAME ONE FLASHBACK

SEPTEMBER 2

“A little piece of all of us died today. I’ve lost some tough games over the years, but I never thought I could feel as badly about losing a single game as I did about this one.

“There was no phase of the game at which they didn’t outplay us. Our guys set this up by losing their poise. I could tell by looking in their eyes that they realized the Russians were very good…

“I didn’t think they were a better team or had better players. Even though they beat us handily I still don’t know if they are. The next seven games will settle that.”

 

All quotes are from Harry Sinden’s “Hockey Showdown: The Canada-Russia Hockey Series”

(Doubleday Canada, 1972)

TEAM BIRTHDAYS IN AUGUST

MARCEL DIONNE - August 3, 1951

KEN DRYDEN  - August 8, 1947

BOB CLARKE - August 13, 1949

BILL GOLDSWORTHY - August 24, 1944

BILL WHITE - August 26, 1939

BRIAN GLENNIE - August 29, 1946

 

Happy Birthday et Joyeux Anniversaire!!!

SUMMIT SERIES FACT:

When Team Canada 1972 entered their August training camp, three junior players (and future NHLers) were invited along - Billy Harris (right wing), Michel "Bunny" Larocque (goalie) and John Van Boxmeer (defence).

TEAM BIRTHDAYS IN JULY

ROD GILBERT - July 1, 1941

PAT STAPLETON - July 4, 1940

BRAD PARK - July 6, 1948

DON AWREY - July 18, 1943

RICHARD MARTIN - July 26, 1951

 

Happy Birthday et Joyeux Anniversaire!!!

TEAM CANADA 1972 MEMBERS VISIT CALGARY

 

Serge Savard, Frank Mahovlich, Don Awrey and Pat Stapleton swung through Calgary recently, for festivities involving Canada's Sports Hall of Fame’s 60th anniversary and its 2015 inductees.

The four players from Team Canada 1972 attended a gala commemorating the Hall’s milestone and partook in green-screen interviews (for the upcoming launch of the Hall’s virtual distance learning programme).

They also participated in a golf tournament and had the opportunity to catch up with fellow Hall members and friends from the hockey world.

PLAYERS HEADING TO CALGARY

Several members of Team Canada 1972 - Serge Savard, Frank Mahovlich, Don Awry and Pat Stapleton - are slated to be in Calgary from June 16 to 19, as part of the celebrations surrounding this year's inductees into Canada's Sports Hall of Fame. (The team entered the Hall in 2005 and are the only complete team ever inducted.)

 

While in Alberta, the players will conduct green-screen interviews and participate in other activities connected with their "28-8" legacy ventures (in partnership with Canada's Sports Hall of Fame and Hockey Canada).

 

SUMMIT SERIES FACT:

All three goalies who played in the Summit Series - Ken Dryden, Tony Esposito and Vladislav Tretiak - have been inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame (Dryden in 1983, Esposito in 1988 and Tretiak in 1989).

TEAM CANADA 1972 : In The News...

Team Canada 1972 grabbed national headlines, as the country's media focussed on Pat Stapleton's discussion of the Summit Series' game-winning puck (and its connection to the team's "28,800 Project").

 

Along with a television interview on CTV, there were articles in the National Post newspaper and online at Yahoo! Sports.

SUMMIT SERIES FACT:

Brad Park's son James was born between Game One and Game Two of the Summit Series.

SERGE SAVARD AWARDED THE ORDER OF HOCKEY IN CANADA

Hockey Canada has announced that it's awarded Team Canada 1972 member Serge Savard the Order of Hockey in Canada (which is given out annually to selected Canadian players, coaches and executives, in recognition of their contribution to the game). He will receive the award on June 10th, at the 2015 Hockey Canada Foundation Celebrity Classic in Toronto.

 

Amongst his career accomplishments, Hockey Canada notes that Team Canada 1972 went 4-0-1 in the Summit Series when Savard was in the lineup. He becomes the second member of the team to be honoured with the Order; Paul Henderson received the award in 2013.

 

Félicitations, Serge!

FROM THE VAULTS - J.P. PARISE (PART I)

Team Canada 1972's friends at the Hockey Hall of Fame have unearthed two archived photos of J.P. Parise, both taken in action during the Summit Series. The HHoF offered them to the team, as part of our online memorial to J.P. (and we're grateful).

In this photo, J.P. is seen backchecking, while Tony Esposito tangles with Soviet captain Boris Mikhailov.

 

(photo credit: Graphic Artists/Hockey Hall of Fame)

FROM THE VAULTS - J.P. PARISE (PART II)

Team Canada 1972's friends at the Hockey Hall of Fame have unearthed two archived photos of J.P. Parise, both taken in action during the Summit Series. The HHoF offered them to the team, as part of our online memorial to J.P. (and we're grateful).

In this photo, J.P. is giving Soviet netminder Vladislav Tretiak hassles in front of the crease, while Ron Ellis watches the play in the background.

 

(photo credit: Graphic Artists/Hockey Hall of Fame)

JEAN-PAUL PARISE : December 11, 1941 - January 7, 2015

Team Canada 1972 is saddened to announce the passing of J.P. Parisé.

A favourite amongst his teammates, J.P. played six games for Team Canada 1972 (collecting four points) and lead the Summit Series in penalty minutes.

Memorably, he changed the course of Game Eight only 4:10 into the first period, when he received a misconduct and game misconduct for threatening a referee (after taking a bogus interference penalty). The incident stoked his team’s passions, which helped fuel their historic comeback.

Team Canada 1972 extends its deepest condolences to J.P.’s beloved wife Donna and to his sons Zach and Jordan.

HARRY SINDEN REMEMBERS "LOYAL" J.P. PARISE...

“He turned pro with me when he was 20, so I knew him a long time. When I was choosing the players for Team Canada 1972, I knew I had to have a player like Jean-Paul. John Ferguson knew J.P. from playing against him and also vouched for him as a player.

“There couldn’t be a better teammate…he was as loyal as they came. He was loyal to his team both on and off the ice, and he had a complete lack of selfishness. He was a top player, a very good player and you knew the effort was 100-percent every night.

“Winning against the Russians was everything to him.”

PAUL HENDERSON REMEMBERS "DOGGED" J.P. PARISE...

“I loved his smile, competitive spirit and infectious sense of humour.

“When you think of a ‘team player’ he exemplified this and whatever the role he was asked to play, he determinedly did it. His dogged and robust play made him a very valuable asset in the ’72 series. 

“He loved coming to our reunion events and we loved having him there. 

“We will miss him, but we sure won't forget him.”

RON ELLIS REMEMBERS "WONDERFUL" J.P. PARISE...

“J.P. Parise was a key member of Team Canada 1972. After the first-game loss, he joined Espo's line and had an immediate impact with his solid two-way game and was instrumental in the must-win Toronto victory. J.P. continued his high level of play throughout the series with heart and passion for the game and country he loved.

“In 2012, during the 40th-anniversary celebrations, J.P. and I joined other teammates for a return visit to Russia. I have fond memories of spending time with J.P. and Donna, as we relived the ‘series of the century’ and the highlight of our hockey careers.

“He was a great teammate and I will forever respect him as a gifted player, but more importantly for his wonderful human qualities that influenced all who were fortunate to know him.”

SUMMIT SERIES "BELIEVE IT OR NOT"

Before Game One in Montreal, legendary NHL goalie Jacques Plante gave advice to Soviet netminder Vladislav Tretiak on how to play against NHLers.

(Plante felt sorry for the Russians, who he believed were going to be swept in the series.)

FAIT DE LA SERIE DU SIECLE:

Le seul membre de l'Équipe Canada 1972 à avoir joué au moins six matchs sans pénalité est Jean Ratelle.

FROM LEGENDS TO LEGACY reunion gala photos now online.

Team Canada 1972 members Phil Esposito (left) and Peter Mahovlich share a laugh before joining their team-mates on stage at "From Legends To Legacy."  (Image credit: Team Canada 1972/Denis Cahill)

 

A photo gallery from the gala reunion event is now available on our MEDIA PAGE.

FROM LEGENDS TO LEGACY a night to remember!

Team Canada 1972 members (L-R) Serge Savard, Ed Johnston, Brad Park and Peter Mahovlich mingle with guests, at the private pre-gala signing session, before treating a packed house to an evening of unforgettable Summit Series stories.  (Image Credit: TVCogeco Niagara) 

 

Team Canada 1972's gala - "From Legends to Legacy" - drew hundreds on October 2nd and every audience member was treated to Summit Series memories through the eyes of the team members themselves.

The reunion event, which raised funds for the team's educational and charitable ventures, was emceed by hockey great Rene Robert; it featured several special guest speakers along with an entertaining "hot-stove" discussion of the historic series with head coach Harry Sinden and players Don Awrey, Bobby Clarke, Yvan Cournoyer, Ken Dryden, Phil Esposito, Rod Gilbert, Jocelyn Guevremont, Dennis Hull, Eddie Johnston, Pete Mahovlich, Brad Park, Jean Ratelle, Serge Savard, Rod Seiling and Pat Stapleton.

Here is some of the pre-event coverage.

For more information, please visit our FROM LEGENDS TO LEGACY page.

WALTER GRETZKY'S SUMMIT SERIES MEMORY...

Recently, Walter Gretzky shared his favourite memory with TeamCanada1972.ca:

"I was working for Bell Canada as a technician in Brantford, Ontario. I spent the day in and out of offices, fixing phone lines and teletype machines. Every office I went to had the game on the radio, and I was astonished to see that everyone was listening in every office.

"Between calls I would rush to the next office, so I wouldn't miss the action. When working, I slowed my pace to hear as much of the game as I could...nobody cared, since nobody was working!

"But everyone was showing how proud they were to be Canadian."

Game Eight Revisited: Laying It All On The Line.

As they stood in a row during the opening ceremonies, Team Canada 1972 was a confident bunch, coming off two straight wins to tie the series. By the time the game was over, the players had battled poor officiating on the ice and Soviet police off the ice (not to mention a sloppy goal judge). And when the dust finally settled, the team had staged the most dramatic comeback in international sports history and cemented their place as Canadian legends.

 

Here's one account:

 

The greatest hockey series ever played would be decided in the final game, in the final minute, at Moscow’s Luzhniki Arena on September 28, 1972. 

 

With Josef Kompalla as one of the game officials there was bound to be trouble. It didn’t take long to happen. At 4:10 of the first period Kompalla called a penalty on J.P. Parise and Parise went beserk, swinging his stick at Kompalla and earning a game misconduct.

 

Despite an early series of penalties Canada managed to come out of the first period with a 2-2 tie. At the end of the second period the Soviet Union was ahead 5-3 and Canada looked like it was going to lose the game and the series. 

 

In the second intermission Team Canada players were determined that this wasn’t going to happen. In the final 20 minutes Canada dug in and scored three consecutive goals to win 6-5. The winner was scored by Paul Henderson at 19:26. It was the right winger’s third consecutive winning goal in the series. “ I found myself in front of the net and Tretiak made one stop, but the puck came right back to me. There was room under him, so poked the puck through. 

 

"When I saw it go in, I just went bonkers,” Henderson recalled after the game. 

 

For more about Game Eight, visit our Summit Series page.

Game Seven Revisited: Da, da, Canada! Nyet, nyet, Soviet!

Though the television images beamed from Moscow (to Finland, to England, then to Canada) were sometimes fuzzy, one thing was clear - Boris Mikhailov kicked Gary Bergman during a scuffle, and it took everything the referees had to keep Bergman, Cournoyer and every other member of Team Canada 1972 from severely pounding the Soviet captain.

 

Here's one account:

 

Game Seven on September 26, 1972, was a must win for Canada. 

 

The arrival of 50,000 telegrams from Canadians back home certainly motivated the players. The team came through as Paul Henderson scored with just 2:06 left in the final period to edge the Soviet Union 4-3. Soviet superstar Valeri Kharlamov sat out the game with a badly bruised ankle courtesy of a Bobby Clarke slash in Game Six. 

 

It might have been the best-played game of the series for Canada. Tony Esposito played a strong game, stopping 28 of 31 shots. Henderson’s second consecutive game-winning tally came with the teams playing four-on-four. “It was the greatest goal of my life,” Henderson said after the game. The series was now tied 3-3-1. 

 

For more about Game Seven, visit our Summit Series page.

Game Six Revisited: Grin And Bear It.

Team Canada 1972 needed to win all three remaining games to claim victory in the Summit Series, and the Soviet Union wasn't going to make it easy for them; the team's food and beverages (brought with them from home) went missing and their hotel-room phones would ring throughout the night. However, all the harassment did not break the team's spirit or resolve.

 

Here's one account:

 

In Game Six at the Luzhniki Arena on September 24, 1972, Canada took a 3-2 lead into the third period, but unlike game five, held on for the win. 

 

The team seemed to be coming into game shape. A concern during the game was the work of the two referees, especially Josef Kompalla (who many believe was East German and biased towards the Soviets). 

 

By the end of the game Canada had 31 minutes in penalties and the Soviet players had four. Fortunately, during the Soviet power plays, Canada’s penalty killers were on top of their game and goalie Ken Dryden was outstanding. Now the series stood at 3-2-1 for the Soviet Union.

 

For more about Game Six, visit our Summit Series page.

Game Five Revisited: To Russia With Love.

When they finished their time in Sweden, Team Canada 1972 travelled to the Soviet Union for the second half of the Summit Series. Soon after they arrived, the team was greeted by thousands and thousands of well-wishing postcards that had been mailed from Canada; the nation was now openly displaying its support, perhaps as a result of being chastised by Phil Esposito after Game Four.

 

Here's one account:

 

The first game played in the Soviet Union was at the Luzhniki Arena in Moscow on September 22, 1972. The old rink, which had wire fencing instead of Plexiglas and was much wider than NHL ice surfaces, presented new challenges for Canada. 

 

The players were heartened by the presence of 3,000 Canadian fans, who quickly made their presence known in the arena. Canada played well in the first two periods and had a 3-0 lead on goals from Parise, Clarke and Henderson. The play of the Clarke-Ellis-Henderson line was outstanding.

 

In the third stanza Canada fell apart as the Soviet Union fired five goals past netminder Tony Esposito. Two goals were scored eight seconds apart. The final score was 5-4 and now Canada trailed the series 3-1-1.

 

For more about Game Five, visit our Summit Series page.

FAIT DE LA SERIE DU SIECLE:

En septembre 1972, Équipe Canada a fait face à trois joueurs qui ont éventuellement été nommés au Temple de la renommée: Vladislav Tretiak (1989), Borje Salming (1996) et Valeri Kharlamov (2005).

Sweden Revisited: Game Two - September 17, 1972

Eddie Johnston - who dressed as the backup goalie for almost the entire Summit Series - got his first start with Team Canada in their second game against the Swedish national squad.

 

Johnston faced 38 shots as the Swedes outplayed Canada, especially in the third period; luckily for the Canadians, Phil Esposito scored short-handed in the last minute of play to salvage a 4-4 tie. Stick-work by both sides lead to bloodshed on the ice, enforcing the media's perception that Team Canada played goon hockey (while press reports often ignored similarly grievous Swedish infractions).

 

For Esposito and his team-mates the next stop was Moscow, where they faced the daunting task of needing to win three of the last four games if they were to emerge victorious from the Summit Series against the Soviets.

 

For more about the games in Sweden, visit our Summit Series page.

Sweden Revisited: Game One - September 16, 1972

The promotional poster for Team Canada's "First Time In Europe" featured Ken Dryden, but he never appeared in their two-game series against the Swedish national squad. That's Inge Hammarstrom on the left, who played in the games and later in the NHL (as did Borje Salming, Anders Hedberg, Ulf Nilsson, Dan Labraaten, Lars-Erik Sjöberg, Thommie Abrahamsson and Björn Johansson).

 

Dryden considers the matches in Sweden as being the lowest point for Team Canada, as they were meaningless to the Summit Series outcome. "Canadian teams aren't very good at playing games where they don't really count," he says. Compounding their misery - though they won the first game 4-1, backstopped by Tony Esposito - was the inconsistency (and some say incompetency) of West German referees Josef Kompalla and Franz Baader, who were to officiate upcoming games in Moscow. 

 

However, head coach Harry Sinden says the players' on-ice intensity increased during their time in Stockholm, as did the bonds between them; the Team Canada that eventually came back to win the Summit Series was forged in Scandinavia.

 

For more about the games in Sweden, visit our Summit Series page.

SUMMIT SERIES MEMORIES...

Carol Stephenson was seven years old during the Summit Series and can remember being with family watching the games. She says that she thought it was unfair that everyone was picking on the Soviet team, so she defended them by gently uttering "Go Russia." After that, she says, her father didn't speak to her for a while.

 

Keith MacDonald was 35 when his friend got tickets to Game Two, in Toronto. He remembers sitting behind the Soviet bench that night (when they lost to Team Canada) and was shocked at how the coaches - Bobrov and Kulagin - "were condemning their team for absolutely everything."

 

Diana Yandt was in grade 13 and on a class field trip to Stratford, Ontario to see "King Lear" at the same time Game Eight was unfolding. "The ushers were all looking for transistor radios in the seats, as they didn't want anyone to get updates while the play was on," she says. The actor portraying Lear (William Hutt) learned of the final score just before the dramatic storm scene, which he performed with full intensity...when finished, he turned to the audience and said "Canada 6. Russia 5." Diana says she remembers that the crowd went nuts.

Game Four Revisited: Team Canada bares its soul.

Serge Savard couldn't play (after sustaining a broken ankle in practice) and missed Team Canada's lowest point in the Summit Series. The hostile criticism they were increasingly subject to, from media and fans, was challenged head-on after the game, when Phil Esposito looked into the television camera - into the watching eyes of the nation - and staunchly defended his wounded team.

 

Here's one account:

 

Game Four was played at the Pacific Coliseum in Vancouver on September 8, 1972. It turned out to be a nightmare for Team Canada. The outstanding goaltending of Vladislav Tretiak and the lack of discipline on Canada’s part made the difference in the Soviet Union’s 5-3 win. Soviet captain Boris Mikhailov scored two power play goals in the first period and his team never looked back.  

Frustrated Vancouver fans booed Team Canada in the third period. All of Team Canada’s players left the ice immediately after the game except Phil Esposito, who was interviewed by CTV’s Johnny Esaw. 

“To the people across Canada, we tried, we gave our best. For the people that boo us, geez, I’m really…all of us guys are really disheartened and we’re disillusioned and we’re disappointed in some of the people…” Esposito said.  

It was a speech that solidified Esposito’s position as the team leader and inspired the people of Canada to support, not ridicule, Team Canada as it headed to Europe to play the final four games of the series.

 

For more about Game Three, visit our Summit Series page.

FAIT DE LA SERIE DU SIECLE:

Serge Savard a joué dans les matchs 2, 3, 6, 7 et 8 de la série.

Équipe Canada n'a perdu aucun de ces matchs.

Game Three Revisited: Team Canada fit to be tied.

Tony Esposito made his second strait start in net, but it was his opposite, Tretiak, who stole the show; in front of a large portrait of Queen Elizabeth, Team Canada outshot the Soviets 37-25, yet gave up two goals while on the power-play. At the end of the night the series remained even and a banner under the Queen reflected a still hopeful nation: "To be FRANK team CAN wont PETER out but SERGE to VICTORY." (Photo credit: Hockey Canada/Brian Pickell)

 

Here's one account:

 

After the first two games of the series, Canada and the Soviet Union knew what to expect from each other. 

Game three, played in the Arena in Winnipeg on September 6, 1972, ended in a 4-4 draw. Canada had a 2-1 lead after the first period and a 4-2 lead in the second, but the Russian squad came up with two clutch goals by Lebedev and Bodunov, members of the Russian “Kid Line” to tie the contest. 

It could have gone either way in the third frame as Tretiak made an outstanding save on Paul Henderson, who was all alone in front of the net, and Brad Park swept away what looked like a sure goal from a shot by the ever-dangerous Valeri Kharlamov.

It now looked like either club could win the series.

 

For more about Game Three, visit our Summit Series page.

SUMMIT SERIES FACT:

Of the 35 players on Team Canada 1972, 15 are in the Hockey Hall of Fame (as is head coach Harry Sinden).

Game Two Revisited: Team Canada comes back.

An emotionally fragile nation tuned in for the second game of the Summit Series, still reeling from Team Canada's humiliating 7-3 opening loss two nights previous. For the country watching on television - and the almost 16,500 people in the stands - the highlight that evening was an amazing individual effort by Peter Mahovlich, which won the game and tied the series. Canada slept a little easier that night.

 

Here's one account:

 

For Game Two in Toronto's Maple Leaf Gardens on September 4, 1972, Team Canada coach Harry Sinden changed his lineup and had a different plan, which included fierce forechecking and a tight defensive game. Tony Esposito replaced Ken Dryden in goal and seven of seventeen players were replaced to bring a more physical presence to Canada's game.

The result was a remarkable turnaround as Team Canada outshot the Soviet Union 36 to 21 and came away with a 4-1 victory. The Esposito brothers were named Team Canada's MVPs of the game, but Mahovlich stole the show with a spectacular shorthanded goal in the third period to put Canada ahead 3-1.

"They were more respectful of us in the second game," said Soviet captain Boris Mikhailov. "They played very well, a physical game. We had not seen such a style of game."

 

For more about Game Two, visit our Summit Series page.

FAIT DE LA SERIE DU SIECLE:

Sur les 35 joueurs d'Équipe Canada 1972, 11 sont nés au Québec.

Game One Revisited: Team Canada learns a lesson.

It was a hot and humid night in Montréal, when Team Canada 1972 skated to meet their Soviet opponents for the first time. Before the highly anticipated game, most people expected a Canadian sweep of the eight-game series and that sentiment was bolstered when Canada scored 30 seconds into the first period. But by the time the game was over, Canada had lost badly and the entire nation was in shock.

 

Here's one account:

 

With team Canada holding a two-goal lead at 6:32 of the first period in the initial game at the Montreal Forum on September 2, 1972, it looked like predictions of a sweep might turn out to be accurate.

And then the Russian team settled its nerves and put its superior conditioning and outstanding hockey skills on display. "I think it's a team effort against a group of individuals," play-by-play commentator Foster Hewitt told a stunned nation. You can't believe their strength and conditioning," said team Canada forward Yvon Cournoyer, after the first period.

The scouting reports were wrong about Soviet netminder Vladislav Tretiak. He could certainly stop the puck and would prove in the future that he was one of the all-time great netminders. The Soviets went on to shock Canada with a 7-3 victory. After the game Team Canada defenceman Brad Park said what his teammates and all Canadians must have been thinking: "We're in trouble."

 

For more about Game One, visit our Summit Series page.

Team Canada 1972 launches new website on Summit Series anniversary.

The members of Team Canada 1972 unveiled their new online presence, on the anniversary of Game One of hockey's historic "Summit Series."

The September 2nd launch of TeamCanada1972.ca comes exactly 42 years after the players first stepped on the ice to compete against the Soviet national team, in Montreal.

Throughout September, TeamCanada1972.ca will revisit the Summit Series with original content and analysis, honouring milestones and events.

The website, along with Facebook and Twitter, are the first components of the team's new national legacy campaign, the "28,800 Project" (coined after the total number of seconds played in the series). The legacy venture involves returning the story of Team Canada 1972's legendary comeback victory to the country's national dialogue and enshrine the intrinsic lessons of teamwork for all Canadians.

With the 28,800 Project, the team has already begun developing relationships with educational, charitable and corporate partners. "It's our way of giving back," notes Brad Park, Team Canada 1972 defenceman and Hockey Hall of Famer.

Park will join his fellow team-mates at a reunion on October 2, when Team Canada 1972 holds a gala event - "From Legends to Legacy" - to celebrate the official launch of the 28,800 Project. Part of the proceeds from the evening will go to the gala's charitable partner, the Niagara Children's Centre.

More information about the team, the gala and the legacy venture can be found throughout TeamCanada1972.ca

Press Conference Coverage.

Both local and national media reacted to Team Canada 1972's press conference (August 27, 2014), where the team announced the October 2nd launch of their 28,800 Project legacy venture.

Television audiences saw pieces on CTV and CBC (in Toronto and on "The National"), while separate radio interviews (live and recorded) were conducted with 610 CKTB and the Fan590.

Online, the story also ran in Winnipeg, St. Catharines, Fort Erie and in other Niagara-region media.

Team Canada 1972 Media Advisory

August 27, 2014

Team Canada 1972 Announces Upcoming Legacy Event.

Phil Esposito stuns crowd with revelation at press conference.

 

St. Catharines, ON - Members of hockey's legendary Team Canada 1972 held a press conference to announce the upcoming launch of the team's new national legacy programme.

Hall of Famer Brad Park and fellow defenceman Pat Stapleton hosted the event. They were joined via conference call by the team's head coach Harry Sinden and players Phil Esposito, Serge Savard and Red Berenson. (Esposito and Savard are also in hockey's Hall of Fame.)

The legacy venture - dubbed the "28,000 Project", after the total number of seconds played in 1972's eight-game Summit Series against the Soviet national team - involves incorporating the lessons in teamwork learned in Canada's come-from-behind victory. "It's not about what we did, but how we did it," notes Stapleton.

Team Canada 1972 will be making a rare appearance together on October 2, at a gala event in St. Catharines, Ontario to mark the official launch of the "28,800 Project". Stapleton - who has been at the forefront of the team's recent coalescence over the venture - says the city was selected for historical reasons, as several 1972 members played junior hockey there (and the design of their iconic jerseys originated in the area).

Amongst those in the audience were Bill and Denise Burke, owners of the local Niagara IceDogs OHL team. During the news conference, Stapleton remarked on the pressure for any St. Catharines squad to succeed, given the historical connection to Team Canada 1972. Members of the media and representatives of the team's educational partner (Brock University's Goodman School of Business) and charity affiliate (the Niagara Children's Centre) were also in attendance.

Scott Smith, COO at Hockey Canada and Mario Siciliano, President and CEO of Canada's Sports Hall of Fame, both spoke of their organizations' support for the "28,800 Project" via the conference call. Dr. Barry Wright, an associate business professor at Brock involved with building the venture's corporate structure, gave a brief history about the legacy project's origins.

The team said it will soon unveil its new website - TeamCanada1972.ca - and celebrate a month of milestone moments of the Summit Series (which began September 2 in Montreal and ended September 28 in Moscow) leading up to the October 2. gala. They added that hockey great Rene Robert will be the MC for the event.

The press conference was treated to "locker-room banter" between team members, with Esposito garnering much attention for his suggestion that their Soviet opponents were on steroids in 1972. "I was told by a very reliable source, someone who played" he stated.

 

For photos from the press conference, visit our Media page.